Morsy has undermined the state, says former prosecutor general

Former Prosecutor General Abdel Meguid Mahmoud has said that President Mohamed Morsy is guilty of "undermining the pillars of the state," after speaking ill of the Egyptian judiciary during his beleaguered one-year-old presidency.
 
“The president’s Constitutional Declaration and my appointment as ambassador to the Vatican was an attempt to encroach on the judiciary,” Meguid Mahmoud said at a news conference aired Tuesday on ONTV. “When I refused, he appointed a colleague of mine as prosecutor general,” referring to his Morsy-picked successor, Talaat Abdallah.
 
The Court of Cassation had declined a challenge submitted by new Prosecutor General Talaat Abdallah against invalidating his appointment.
 
Meguid Mahmoud also said he would return to office once the court ruling had been formulated. “I have resorted to the law since the beginning of that problem,” he said.
 
“If the president says the Constitutional Declaration and my dismissal were revolutionary demands,” he wondered, “what about the lawsuits against the new prosecutor general? Were those not revolutionary demands?”
 
Meguid Mahmoud pointed out that all former regime members, such as ex-Interior Minister Habib al-Adly, Ahmed Ezz and Boutros Ghali, were taken to prison when he was still in office. “Why did Morsy not show the complaints that he says I was hiding?” he asked.
 
“I was the one who ordered a travel ban for [former dictator Hosni] Mubarak and his family, and who froze their money,” he added.
 
“Where are the rights of the martyrs since Morsy and the new prosecutor general assumed office?"