Ministry of Culture protesters march to Tahrir

Ministry of Culture protesters march to Tahrir

An Egyptian artist plays the Oud as demonstrators perform a sit-in at the office of culture minister, Alaa Abdelfattah, in Cairo on June 6, 2013, calling for his resignation. (AFP File Photo)

An Egyptian artist plays the Oud as demonstrators perform a sit-in at the office of culture minister, Alaa Abdel Aziz, in Cairo on June 6, 2013, calling for his resignation.
(AFP File Photo)

On Sunday 7 July, the demonstrators at the sit-in outside the Ministry of Culture marched to Tahrir Square to “emphasise on the legitimacy of the people,” and condemn the alleged violence by Muslim Brotherhood protesters during the past week.

A crowd gathered at the ministry at 4pm, then headed to Tahrir at 4.30pm. A sizable number of people joined, but the march was not as large as the 30 June march.  Walking with the group was a number of cultural figures, including actors Mahmoud Kabil, Salwa Mohamed Ali, Fardous Abdel Hamid and Ahmed Abdel Aziz.

“After this march [and the day’s protests], we ask the armed forces to tell the people to stay home for 72 hours so they can deal with the thugs on the street,” said Kabil. Actress Fardous Abdel Hamid also stressed on the importance of the armed forces during those critical times, and called for the people to support them.

Musician Nesma Abdel Aziz also attended the rally, saying: “Egypt is ours. We will not give up on our rights.” Many marchers carried signs with messages to Obama and the United States, asking them not to interfere in Egypt’s internal affairs. Chants criticised the Brotherhood, as well as Al-Nour Party.

Other prominent figures that attended the march were actress and columnist Lobna Abdel Aziz, writer Fatheya Al-Assal and producers Medhat Al-Adl and Mohamed Al-Adl. The rally itself was filmed by director Sandra Nashaat.

The demonstrations was secured by police forces, as well as the citizen group Zamalek Guardians, founded by Osman Abaza, Mohanad Fikry and Ziad Ammar during the 2011 revolution to protect the neighbourhood against criminal activity.

“We have been present in elections and referendums; we helped in organising people and making sure that the election process goes smoothly. We are involved in anything related to Zamalek,” said Abaza.

“We keep track of [any criminal activity], like shops being robbed or broken into,” said Fekry. However, he confirmed that the police have secured the Zamalek neighbourhood quite well during the past months.

They recalled the unrest last Friday when some Brotherhood members tried to enter the area, and threw rocks from 6 October bridge. “We blocked off all the roads with the help of the army,” said one Zamalek Guardian.

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